Latest Nordic Walking Research

Effects of Nordic Walking

 

Effects of Nordic walking on cardiovascular risk factors in overweight individuals with type 2 diabetes, impaired or normal glucose tolerance
Abstract

The effects of Nordic walking on cardiovascular risk factors were determined in overweight individuals with normal or disturbed glucose regulation. We included 213 individuals, aged 60?±?5.3?years, with BMI 30.2?±?3.8?kg/m2 ; of these 128 had normal glucose tolerance (NGT), 35 had impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and 50 had type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Participants were randomized to unaltered physical activity or to five hours per week of Nordic walking with poles, for a four month period. Dietary habits were unaltered. BMI, waist circumference, blood pressure, glucose tolerance, clinical chemistry, maximal oxygen uptake (peak VO2), and self-reported physical activity (questionnaire) were assessed at the time of inclusion and after four months. The participants in the exercise intervention group kept a walking diary. In the NGT exercise group, self-reported physical activity increased markedly and body weight (?2.0?±?3.8?kg), BMI (?0.8?±?1.4?kg/m2 ) and waist circumference (?4.9?±?4.4?cm), (mean?±?SD) decreased. Exercise power output (12.9?±?9.9?W) and peak VO2(2.7?±?2.8?ml x kg -1 x min -1 ) increased in the IGT exercise group. More cardiovascular risk factors were improved after exercise intervention in people with NGT compared with IGT or T2DM. Exercise capacity improved significantly in all three groups among participants at least 80% compliant with the scheduled exercise.

Nordic walking improved anthropometric measurements and exercise capacity. However, unsupervised Nordic walking may not provide a sufficient increase in exercise intensity to achieve ultimate health-promoting benefits on the cardiovascular parameters assessed in this study, particularly for those with disturbed glucose regulation 

 

Source:  http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/dmrr.2321/abstract

Nordic Walking - a winner for Heart Failure patients

A very popular fitness activity called European Nordic walking increases the health of patients with heart failure, a new small study.

Nordic Walking, people walking on a stick and move your hand in a motion similar to a ski. Form of rapid growth in the European sport that is safe for older patients.

Aerobic exercise will improve the quality of life of patients with heart failure and reduce the risk of hospitalization, but many patients with heart failure is difficult to implement.

The new study, which included 12 patients with heart failure, found that Nordic walking allows patients to safely increase the intensity of your workout and subsequent heart / lung benefits within normal walking.

The research findings were presented this month at Heart Failure Congress in Belgrade, Serbia, which is the annual meeting of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

“In a Nordic walking is a heavy workload because we use other muscle groups,” lead author Andrzej Lejczak, a physiotherapist in the Military Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland, and a PhD student in the School Physical Education in Wroclaw, said in a news release from the association.

“We walked on four feet, so we are your arms and legs at the same time – that’s why we have a positive response,” he said.

The results showed that the “Nordic walking is safe to put in a cardiac rehabilitation program for patients with heart failure,” said Lejczak.

Because the study was too small and the results were presented at medical meetings, data and conclusions should be considered early to publish in peer-reviewed medical journals.

Source: http://weightmedical.com/2012/08/nordic-walking-a-winner-for-heart-failure-patients-study-says.html

Nordic Walking for Heart Failure Patients

Aerobic exercise improves heart failure patients' quality of life and reduces their risk of hospitalisation, but many heart failure patients find it difficult to exercise.

A new study, which included 12 heart failure patients, concluded that Nordic walking enables these patients to boost safely the intensity of their exercise and to gain additional heart/lung benefits over normal walking.

The study findings were scheduled for presentation in May 2012 at the Heart Failure Congress in Belgrade, Serbia, which is the annual meeting of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

"In Nordic walking we have a big workload because we use additional muscle groups," lead author Andrzej Lejczak, a physiotherapist at the Military Hospital in Wroclaw, Poland, and a Ph.D. student at the University School of Physical Education in Wroclaw, said in an association news release. "We walk with four limbs, so we're exercising our arms and legs at the same time -- that's why we have such a beneficial response," he explained. The findings show that "Nordic walking is safe to include in cardiac rehabilitation programs for patients with heart failure," Lejczak added.

Because the study was very small and the findings were presented at a medical meeting, the data and conclusions should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

Nordic Walking for the Vision Impaired

small_NW_poles_May_2012Beth Helmers from Guide Dogs Association ACT / NSW is a qualified Nordic Walking Instructor with Nordic Academy. Two years ago she was trained as a leader. Along with her Patrick introduced Nordic Walking to Janet who is blind - with great success. Janet said she walked much more confident with the poles.

Beth continued to be qualified as an instructor to take Nordic Walking further. Her aim is to get children onto Nordic Walking poles. We recently prepared a few sets of poles for kids agen between seven and 11.

 

 

 

 

 

(cut to length poles; from 80 cms to 95 cms)

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